Pakistan, Souad Sbai: Sanaa and The Other Girls Were Killed Because They Were Too Integrated in Our Society

Souad Sbai, former member of the Italian Parliament and President of the “Averroes” Study Center, comments on the recent murder of Sana Cheema.

“Gujrat is a Pakistani town, located in the Punjab region, mainly living on agriculture and handicraft. The latter produces the shishas that have become so fashionable in the West, as the symbol of the merge of distant cultures, at least so it seems.

However, a few days ago Gujrat witnessed a new tragedy that, by contrast, highlights the cultural distance rather than the proximity.

Sanaa Chema was born in Gujrat twenty-five years ago, but emigrated with her family to Brescia, Italy, when she was just a child.

A few years later, her family decided to emigrate again, relocating in Germany to look for a better future. But Sanaa wanted to remain in Italy, and managed to receive the authorization of her parents with the excuse of having found a job. The job was indeed an excuse, because Sanaa just wanted to remain in Italy to stay with her boyfriend, a young Italian who wanted to marry her. Obviously, such a prospect cannot and must not be allowed in a Pakistani family, where arranged marriages are ordinary.

Therefore, when Sanaa traveled to Gujrat for a few days to visit her family, her father and her brother destroyed her desire to conduct a Western way of life, and to marry an Italian boy: they cut her throat.

Sanaa’s tragic story is similar to that of other girls who were also brutally murdered, such as Hina Saleem, Butt Nosheen and Samia Shadid.

If this is the destiny reserved for women trying to escape from arranged marriages, I wonder what can expect those who are accused of the crime of apostasy, such as Rachida.

Rachida was about to convert to Catholicism, and I recounted her story in a book. She was of Moroccan origins, residing in the province of Reggio Emilia. When her husband discovered that she had started to attend a parish in secret, he killed her with a hammer.

Sanaa and Rashida’s destinies meet in the strange plot of the politically and islamically correct, whereby the cultural extenuating circumstance is the refrain, multiculturalism is the score to play, and integration the last bar with the bitter sneer.